HOW DO I RESIZE MY FILE?

In order to print the size image you want, you may need to adjust the size of your image to print at the best possible DPI for the size. Here's a video showing how to resize your file.

 

WHAT SIZE OF FILE SHOULD I UPLOAD?

File size refers to the images MB size (KB or GB is also possible). Our Editor has a max MB cap at 18MB and it might be necessary for some images to have their file size reduced for upload.

 

WHAT COLOR MODE AND COLOR PROFILE SHOULD I USE?

Although we print in CMYK color mode, we prefer that files uploaded are in the RGB color mode with an sRGB color space. We allow the printer to make the color conversion from one color mode to the other at the time of printing. If any other color profile is used for uploading (such as Adobe RGB), the printed result will have unpredictable variations in brightness, contrast, or coloring.

 

WHY DO YOU USE THE sRGB COLOR SPACE?

We opted to use a common and accessible color profile that reproduces well with our processes. We understand there are other color profiles that offer a wider range of colors and are popular color spaces amongst pros. Starting as a consumer friendly printing service, we wanted to take away some of the complexities that can come with photo printing and this profile reproduces best with our method. 

 

WILL MY PHOTOS PRINT DARK?

Often, it is necessary to edit for the differences in how images transfer from screen to print since ink on paper does not have the same advantages as a high-res backlit computer screen. Also, since we use an uncoated matte paper, ink absorbs a bit more and thus images that are dark can look even darker in print. One trick we use to account for the transition from screen to print is to drop our screen brightness down slightly (no less then 50%) and then make any adjustments to brightness or contrast from there to help ensure a bright and clear print.

 

Want some tips on how to capture the best light? Check out Our Tips from Matthew Payne.


                                                                                                            ***300 DPI is always best for images when possible